Tag Archives: added sugars

Nutrition Label Changes

Remember how over 2 years ago I told you how you could tell the FDA what you thought about changes to the food label? Well, I hope you did. If you did, maybe your voice counted.

Recently, the FDA announced what changes they will be making to the nutrition facts labels on your foods. The new labels will have to be in place by July 2018, which is quite awhile. But it is great to see some changes. Here’s the label:

New Nutrition Labels

What’s New (my highlights):

-Updates to the serving size. Not only is the font bigger, but the amounts should be changing. No longer will there be serving sizes on a cookie that are ¼ of a cookie. Serving sizes and nutrition facts must reflect amounts people actually eat. Hooray!

-Other items bolded or in larger font for ease of finding key information, like calories.

-Added sugars will now be on the label. I am very excited about this. Now you can know how much sugar is being added to foods that naturally have sugar in them, such as yogurt and fruit products.

-Vitamin D and Potassium will now be on the label rather than vitamin A and C. I am also a big fan of this change. Vitamin D and potassium are key nutrients for heart health, and those with kidney disease need to be acutely aware of their potassium intake. This will help.

This is a great change for food labeling. Hopefully, it helps us make better choices in the grocery stores. For more details on all the changes, visit fda.gov. Let me know your thoughts on the changes in the comments!

Leave a comment

Filed under Nutrition

To sugar or not to sugar

When I was little, my favorite cereal was Frosted Flakes.  What was a kid not to love?  As it was also my mom’s favorite, we got to eat fairly regularly.  However, occasionally, we ran out.  And my Dad insisted that you could just sprinkle some sugar in a bowl of corn flakes and get the same result.  WRONG!

I was reminded of these morning battles when I saw a blogger say that she bought the plain shredded wheat cereal for her family then had them add sugar, rather than buy the frosted cereal.  And I babysat some children whose mother had successfully convinced them that adding honey to a bowl of regular Cheerios was the same as eating Honey Nut Cheerios.  These mothers must be more convincing than my father.

But all of this had me puzzling – is it really healthier to sprinkle sugar in a cereal than just buy the sugar version?  From my observations, people dump in at least a teaspoon of sugar when doing that.  Well, today, we are going to crunch the numbers.  For consistency sake, I am going to say that people add 1 teaspoon of sugar (or honey) to their cereal.  Also, we are going to assume that our hypothetical cereal eaters drink all the milk in the bowl.  While I personally find this disgusting, it is the only way I know to make this fair.  If you add in sugar, a lot of it dissolves into the milk.  However, have you ever looked at a frosted mini wheat after it has been in the milk awhile?  That sugar dissolves too.

Here goes:

Nutrients 50 g shredded wheat cereal + 1 teaspoon sugar 50 g frosted shredded wheat cereal 1 cup Cheerios + 1 teaspoon honey 1 cup Honey Nut Cheerios
Calories 187 175 126 140
Carbohydrates 45 42 27 30
Sugar 4 10 7 12
Fiber 7 5 3 3

(I used 50 g for the shredded wheat, since that is approximately a serving size listed on a package).

So, you really do save yourself some added sugars when you add the sugar yourself.  BUT, that does mean you have to be careful in how much you add.  A teaspoon of sugar adds 4 g of sugar.  A teaspoon of honey adds 6 g of sugar.  So, it doesn’t take much to make them about the same.  I added the fiber line because I found it slightly interesting that the frosted cereal has less fiber.  I’m assuming this is because you are getting more actual wheat cereal in 50 g of the plain cereal and adding your own sugar versus 50 g of cereal including the sugar.

So parents everywhere are justified.  Even if it doesn’t really taste the same.

Happy cereal eating!

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

Leave a comment

Filed under Nutrition