Tag Archives: chinese

Mu Shu Pork Burritos

Growing up, my family ate the same few things from Chinese restaurants: sweet and sour pork, cashew chicken, and beef and broccoli. Don’t get me wrong. Those are delicious and easy crowd pleasers with kids. But as an adult, I’ve branched out a bit more and discovered and AMAZING world of options. One of those: mu shu.

These mu shu pork “burritos” simplify homemade Chinese by subbing easy access flour tortillas for the delicious little pancakes you get at restaurants. These are super simple to throw together and delicious! Have a great weekend!

Mu Shu Pork Burritos (Serves 4)

Mu Shu Pork Burritos

1 lb pulled pork
8 small whole wheat flour tortillas or 4 regular tortillas
3 eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
¼ head green cabbage, thinly sliced
½ onion, thinly sliced
1 cup thinly sliced carrots
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons rice vineagr
2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
sriracha, to taste
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon sesame oil
3 green onions, thinly sliced

1. Wrap tortillas in foil. Place in a 300 degree oven to warm (5-10 minutes at most).
2. Heat a large nostick skillet over high heat. Add 2 teaspoons sesame oil. Add eggs and scramble. Remove to a plate/bowl and set aside.
3. Add cabbage, onion, carrot, and garlic to skillet. Cook for about 5 minutes, or until vegetables have softened.
4. Mix vinegar through sesame oil in a small bowl. Pour over vegetables. Stir until thickened. Stir in eggs and pork until all combined.
5. To serve, make “burritoes” of pork/vegetable mixture and top with green onions.

Recipe Notes: You could sub ground pork for the pulled pork. I would brown it first, then remove it from the skillet to scramble the eggs.

Nutritional Information (amount per serving):

Calories: 445
Protein: 26 gm
Fat: 21 gm
Saturated fat: 6 gm
Cholesterol: 197 mg
Carbohydrates: 38 gm
Fiber: 4 gm
Sodium: 878 mg

Source: adapted from Keeping Up Cookbook

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Pressure Cooker Honey Sesame Chicken

So this makes the third recipe in a row that requires a pressure cooker. But I feel like almost everyone has an Instant Pot at this point (or is getting one for Christmas). I actually don’t, but I do own a stove top pressure cooker.

The awesome part of pressure cookers is how quickly things come together. I love using mine to make brown rice in about 30 minutes, much faster than the hour suggested on the package.

Meat dishes are a little trickier since you can’t know if it is “done” without opening it. But the chicken pieces in this dish cook quickly so that isn’t a concern.

This dish is as good as take out. And can be made very quickly, if you are in a rush (which who isn’t this time of year?). Enjoy!

Pressure Cooker Honey Sesame Chicken (Serves 6)

Pressure Cooker Honey Sesame Chicken

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces
½ tablespoon canola oil
½ onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup low sodium soy sauce
¼ cup ketchup
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 teaspoon sesame oil
½ cup honey
2 tablespoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons cold water
2 green onions, chopped
4 cups cooked brown rice

1. Preheat pressure cooker. When hot, add the oil, onion, garlic, and chicken to the pot. Sauté for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion softens.

2. Stir in the soy sauce, ketchup, and red pepper flakes. Lock the lid in place. Once the cooker comes to pressure, cook for 3 minutes.

3. When the cook time ends, a quick pressure release. When the valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Add the sesame oil and honey to the pot and stir to combine.

4. In a small bowl, whisk the cornstarch and cold water until smooth. Add to the pot. Simmer, stirring constantly, until the sauce thickens. Stir in the green onions. Serve over rice

Recipe Notes: I really like to serve this with a cooked bag of stir fry vegetables as well. Really rounds out the meal.

Nutritional Information (amount per serving):

Calories: 531
Protein: 47 g
Fat: 9 g
Saturated Fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 132 mg
Carbohydrates: 66 g
Fiber: 3 g
Sodium: 945 mg

Source: Two Peas and Their Pod

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Lo Mein

Panda Express’s lo mein is one of my favorite fast foods. A few weeks ago, I needed a quick dinner for my family on a night where I hadn’t planned ahead well. I realized quickly that I had most of the ingredients for lo mein already on hand. It was a great night, and much cheaper than running to my local restaurant. Enjoy!

Lo Mein (Serves 4)

Lo Mein

½ package whole wheat thin spaghetti
1 chicken breast, chopped
2 cloves garlic
1 inch ginger root, peeled and grated or minced small
½ large onion, sliced
1 rib celery, sliced
¾ cup julienne carrot
½ cabbage, shredded
1 zucchini, sliced
⅓ cup low sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon brown sugar
dash sriracha

1. Cook pasta according to package directions, minus salt or oil. Drain and set aside.

2. Heat a large nonstick skillet or wok over medium high heat. Add chicken. Cook until done about 5-7 minutes. Remove to a plate.

3. Add garlic, ginger, onion, celery, and carrot to pan. Saute for 5-7 minutes, until vegetables are mostly softened. Stir frequently to prevent any burning. Add cabbage and zucchini. Cook 3-5 minutes more.

4. In a small bowl, combine soy sauce, brown sugar, and sriracha.

5. Add chicken and noodles to vegetables in skillet. Add soy sauce mixture. Stir and cook over heat until well combined, about 2 minutes. Serve hot.

Nutritional Information (Amount per serving):

Calories: 318
Protein: 27 g
Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Cholesterol: 50 mg
Carbohydrates: 50 g
Fiber: 9 g
Sodium: 853 mg

Source: adapted from several sources online

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Amped up Fried Rice

Are you a plain rice or fried rice person with your Chinese food?  I’m about 50/50.  I prefer plain rice to put under my entrees, but I don’t feel completely satisfied without fried rice somewhere in the mix.  Although lately, I feel like the fried rice I’ve been getting has been pretty lackluster and not even worth ordering.  This is especially sad, when a few ingredients take fried rice from blah to amazing.

Fried rice is great for making at home.  It makes a great side dish or a really simple entree as well.  Your veggies and proteins are entirely up to you.  It’s a great way for using up leftover rice or meat sitting in your fridge, including any from a takeout restaurant.  I love serving this with salmon or pork chops.  When serving it with a protein entree, I usually skip adding any eggs or meat to the rice.  But feel free to customize.

Enjoy!

Fried Rice  (Serves 4-6 as a side dish)

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1 cup uncooked brown rice (or 2 cups cooked)
¾ cup chopped carrots
½ tablespoon canola oil
1 small onion, diced
1 small bell pepper, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce (or more, to taste)
1 ½ cups frozen peas
2 large eggs (optional)

1. Cook rice according to package directions in rice cooker or on stovetop. For last 10 minutes of cooking, stir in chopped carrots. Set aside and let cool.

2. Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté onions and pepper until tender, about 5 minutes. Add in garlic, cook 1 minute more.

3. Add rice and carrots to skillet. Stir in soy sauce and frozen peas. Stir everything to combine.

4. Scoot ingredients to one side of skillet. Crack eggs into open area in skillet. Stir to scramble. Once cooked, stir into rest of rice. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Information (Amount per Serving):

Calories: 181
Protein: 6 g
Fat: 4 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Cholesterol: 62 mg
Carbohydrates: 30 g
Fiber: 3 g
Sodium: 208 mg

Recipe notes: If using leftover rice, you can omit the carrots or use frozen carrots that will heat up quickly like the peas. Try to add as little soy sauce as possible and still get the flavor you want. The sodium will add up quickly. If adding in chopped chicken or pork, you can sauté that with the onions and peppers. Or if using cooked meat, stir it in with the soy sauce and peas.

Source: Adapted from The Pioneer Woman

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Sesame Chicken

A recipe for fried food seems out of place on a website for healthy recipes.  But I’m sharing this recipe for several reasons.

1) You can enjoy everything in moderation. We love sesame chicken, but we only make this two or three times a year as a special treat.

2) If you are careful about the temperature of your oil, you can really minimize the oil absorbed in frying. It isn’t health food now, but it doesn’t have to be horrible for you.

3) Making this at home is better than ordering take-out. You can control the ingredients in the sauce. You can control the frying temperature and oil absorbed. You can add a ton of veggies to lighten it up.

This recipe is in my husband’s top five favorites of food I make. It tastes as good or better than a restaurant. Enjoy!

Sesame Chicken (Serves 4-6)

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3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

Batter:
6 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil, optional
4 tablespoons flour
4 tablespoons cornstarch
4 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon baking powder

Sauce:
½ tablespoon sesame oil
¼ teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon granulated garlic or garlic powder
1 teaspoon sriracha or chili garlic sauce
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
½ cup sugar
¼ cup cornstarch

1 ½ quarts vegetable or peanut oil, for frying
4-6 cups cooked brown rice (1 cup per person)
1-2 (10 ounce) bags frozen stir fry vegetables, steamed on top of rice cooker while rice was cooking
3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, optional garnish

1. Cut chicken into small, bite sized pieces.

2. Combine batter ingredients in a medium bowl until smooth. Add chicken pieces, tossing to coat. Set aside while you make sauce and heat oil.

3. For sauce, heat sesame oil in bottom of small-medium saucepan over medium heat. Add ginger and garlic; cook until beginning to become fragrant. Combine remaining sauce ingredients in a bowl, whisking to dissolve cornstarch. Pour into pan, stirring constantly to prevent clumping. Keep warm over low heat and sauce thickens.

4. Heat oil to 375 degrees in a large, heavy bottomed pot.

5. Working in batches, fry chicken, removing excess batter before placing in the oil. Fry until golden and crispy, 3-5 minutes. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels.

6. Serve with sauce over cooked rice and vegetables. Garnish with sesame seeds if desired.

Nutritional Information (Amount per serving with 6 servings)

Calories: 740
Protein: 37 g
Fat: 26 g
Saturated Fat:13 g
Cholesterol: 83 mg
Carbohydrates: 90 g
Fiber: 8 g
Sodium: 964 mg

Recipe Notes: I often omit the sesame oil in the batter. I often substitute vegetable oil for the sesame oil in the sauce as well. You could probably use only one bag of vegetables if serving four people, but it will be tight.  I included all of the batter in the nutrient analysis, but you likely won’t use all of it. I added ½ cup oil (about 10%) to the nutrient analysis for frying. I know the nutrition doesn’t look great on this, but imagine what your take-out restaurant’s nutrition looks like? And, like I said above, we only eat this a few times a year.

Source: slightly adapted from Tyler Florence

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