Tag Archives: overweight

New Year, New Goals, New Weight?

Over the last two years, I’ve waxed long about not setting goals about weight (here and here among many others). Focus on changes for health. If your making healthier choices, you will often lose weight and be able to sustain that weight loss. And even if you don’t lose weight, your health will have improved.

However, I recognize that may not be enough for many of us. This year, I’m included. I admit to having some weight loss on my New Year’s resolutions, thanks to some residual baby weight. I am sticking to my previous statements of not JUST having goals of weight loss. I have several other goals for exercise and diet to help me achieve my weight loss.

I read an interesting article with a paradigm shifting idea on weight monitoring. For years, health professionals have recommended only monitoring weight once a week at most. However, recent studies are showing that daily weight monitoring could be beneficial for weight loss.

The article points out that daily weights can help you see more immediate effects of good or bad choices, maybe helping you stick to diet changes more closely. When you cut out late night snacking and see your weight change quickly, you are motivated to keep that up. If you splurge going out one day and you see your weight spike the next day or two, you become more focused on healthy changes again.

I don’t think it is for everyone, but it is something worth considering. What do you think? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

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Weight loss plans stalled?

All of us either have experienced diet failure ourselves or known someone who has. Most people lose little to no weight while on a diet. Those who do lose any, gain it right back.

A recent article highlighted the reasons why, for many Americans, diet and exercise will not be enough to attain and maintain desired weight loss. The article focuses on many biological changes that occur in the body once a person has been obese for a sustained period of time (at least 2 years or so). One of these is what I have previously called the “set point” theory of weight. But there are many others. Unless something happens to change the hormones and regulatory systems of the body, a formerly obese person’s body will always be fighting to regain the weight.

This sounds pretty depressing and not helpful on a healthy eating blog. But the article points out that even a 5-10% weight loss can have significant health benefits even if you are obese. I’ve mentioned this in previous posts (here and here). My main hope for this blog is to help you eat healthier, no matter your weight. And the article makes a valid point: if you are obese and can’t lose weight, you should seek medical help. You are not a failure for not making a diet work alone.

So eat healthy, be happy, and get help if you need it!

To read more about the research, click here.

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

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Eating with Friends

Do you eat differently based on the people you are eating with? A recent study found that your eating companion’s weight may effect how you eat. When eating with an overweight companion, participants in the study were more likely to eat large portions of pasta and small portions of salad. When eating with a normal weight companion, participants ate more salad and less pasta.

While the results of this study are interesting, I am definitely not suggesting that you stop being friends with people who are overweight. That is just rude! However, it is a good idea to evaluate your eating tendencies around different groups of people. If you tend to overeat around one group of friends, be more conscious of what and how much you eat next time you are with them. If you change your eating habits, it could influence them for the better as well, making the whole group healthier. If you find eating healthy difficult around a certain group, try to find other activities to enjoy with them besides eating.

Peer pressure when eating is a real thing. My husband’s family is very good about being health conscious, and they often share entrees or order salads when they go out to eat. When I’m with them, I tend to order salads or a smaller entree. When I go out with my best friend, I feel comfortable ordering as unhealthy as I want and getting dessert to top it off.

Remember, you can make healthy choices, no matter the circumstances. A little planning and evaluating relationships may just help you, too.

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

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