Tag Archives: soy

Dealing with Food Allergies and Intolerances

I recently had some people over for dinner.  I was craving nachos, so that is what I served.  As I was about to cuchocolate cake for dessert, one of them tells me that he has celiac and can’t eat gluten.  I had no idea before dinner.  Sadly, I didn’t have any dessert alternatives for him.  But I’m grateful I made nachos instead of my other idea of spaghetti and meatballs!

This is one of many encounters I have had recently with food allergies and intolerances.  I will admit, I am extremely thankful that I don’t have to deal with any of these problems in my little family.  Reading labels, buying specialty products, cooking from scratch, and teaching children, friends, and family can be a full time job in many cases.  Following these diets isn’t optional; for many, it is life or death.

Here are a few tips on following a food allergy diet:

-Try to focus on what you can eat.  If you try to change all of your regular recipes to be free of a particular allergen, you can go crazy.  For example, if you can’t cook with dairy, don’t start with a lasagna recipe, which has multiple dairy ingredients.  Instead, think of something similar without dairy, such as spaghetti.

-Similar to above, build recipes with ingredients you know you can eat.  Make lists of ingredients you have in your pantry or you know you can buy.  Then start picking ingredients from the list that go together.

-Find good resources.  There are many cookbooks and websites out there.  A good place to start online is nutritionblognetwork.com.  All of the blogs in this database are written by registered dietitians.  You can trust that they are providing accurate information.

-Try to be as liberal as possible with the diet.  I’m not saying eat foods you shouldn’t.  For any of us, it is easy to get in a rut with what we eat.  If you are limited by a food allergy, you can easily eat a very limited diet of a few foods over and over.  Try to keep things as lively and interesting as you can.  The less deprived you feel, the better off you will be.

If you or someone close to you has a food allergy or intolerance, I’d love to hear about how you cope in the comments.  Good luck to all of those dealing with food allergies out there!  Happy eating!

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

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GMO Fact or Fiction, Part 3

Over the last 2 weeks, I’ve been discussing what GMOs are, where they are in our food supply, and the pros of using these in agriculture. If you haven’t read those posts, I recommend you read them before embarking on this one.

Today, I will be discussing the cons of GMOs in food. I will try to touch respond to any pros if there is another side to the story as well as bring in any unique ideas.

-Improved yields aren’t helping feed a growing population. Many countries, including China and some in Africa, will not import GMO products from the United States. So while improved yields could help us feed the millions of people who are starving worldwide, they aren’t helping if we can’t get that food to the people.

-Improved yields through self-fertilization and drought resistance are ideas that have been promised by companies, but few to no GMO crops are actually available that have these characteristics.

-With herbicide tolerant crops, chemical herbicide use actually increased rather than decreased. Since the crops themselves are not sensitive to the herbicides, farmers can spray more herbicide without worrying about harming their crops. (However, some would say that the herbicides used may be more environmentally friendly.)

-Weeds have now become resistant to the more common herbicides available to farmers. Several different weeds now have resistance to Round-up, the most common herbicide used.

-We aren’t sure about safety. While there are studies that would suggest consuming GMO based foods are safe, many of these studies are from older generations of GMO crops. Also, since these are relatively new, we don’t have long-term data on safety yet.

Next week, I’ll bring it all together and share my thoughts on using GMO crops in food. Happy eating!

Have any nutrition questions? Need help with meal planning or a special dietary need? Send your questions to me at kimberlykmarsh(at)gmail(dot)com, and I will answer them in upcoming posts!

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