Tag Archives: yeast

Molasses Bread

I’m posting yet another recipe that requires the oven and another bread recipe. I know. But I’m hoping that as not sweltering pregnant ladies, you will be open to actually turning yours on. And we all love carbs, let’s be real.

Obviously, my family really liked this recipe, or I wouldn’t be posting it here. However, the site I originally got this from claimed it is like the bread at Outback or other steakhouse chains. Admittedly, it’s been more than a year since I went to one of those. But this bread is different from that to me. Very delicious, but not that specific bread. And if you have some calories to splurge on some honey butter, they would be well spent.

Enjoy!

Molasses Bread (Makes 3 loaves, serves about 15-16)

Molasses Bread

2 ½ cups warm water (about 110 degrees)
1 ½ tablespoons instant yeast
⅓ cup molasses
2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
3 tablespoons canola oil
⅓ cup honey
½ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vital wheat gluten
6-7 cups white whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons butter, melted, optional
Old-fashioned oats for sprinkling, optional

1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the water, yeast, molasses, cocoa powder, oil, honey, salt, gluten, and 2 cups flour. Mix until combined.

2. With the mixer running, slowly add the rest of the flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Knead for 7-10 minutes. The dough should be soft and slightly tacky.

3. Grease the sides of bowl. Cover bowl and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

4. Punch down the dough and divide into 3 equal pieces. Form into tight loaves and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Cover and let rise until puffy and doubled in size.

5. Preheat oven to 375. Bake the loaves for 25 minute-30 minutes. If sprinkling with oats, remove loaves after 25 minutes, lightly brush with butter and sprinkle on oats before baking for remaining 5-7 minutes.

Nutritional Information (Amount per serving):

Calories: 258
Protein: 9 g
Fat: 4 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 50 g
Fiber: 6 g
Sodium: 83 mg

Recipe Notes: The butter and oats at the end are only for presentation. Feel free to skip it. As I mentioned above, honey butter on this is amazing.

Source: Mel’s Kitchen Cafe

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Homemade Hamburger Buns

Two startling realizations popped into my head last night.  First, I don’t remember the last time I purchased a pre-made bread product (sandwich, bagel, bun, etc).  This made me feel almost Amish and weird.  I used to read blogs about women who made all their own bread and think, “Don’t they have anything better to do? Go buy a loaf of bread!”  I find baking bread soothing, what can I say.   Second, April is almost over.  May means Memorial Day which means grilling season which means summer in my mind.  Summer.  It’s almost here!

Those thoughts collide with today’s recipe:  homemade hamburger buns.  If any of you are skeptical, I was right there with you when I saw this recipe online almost a year ago.  Why would I make hamburger buns?  Plain ones are $1 a pack at the store.  Whole wheat can be a bit pricey, but it’s got to be worth the money, right?

These buns were pretty awesome, though.  Light and fluffy, but can stand up to a burger.  And for a raised bread product, these are very fast and easy to make.  While I’d probably go the store bought route if feeding a large crowd, these are perfect for feeding a small group.  And they freeze really well, which is always a bonus.

Enjoy!

Homemade Hamburger Buns (Makes about 10 buns)

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2 tablespoons yeast
1 cup warm water (about 110 degrees)
3 tablespoons canola oil
3 tablespoons sugar
1 egg
¼ teaspoon salt
3 cups white whole wheat flour
1 ½ tablespoons vital wheat gluten
garlic powder (optional)
sesame seeds (optional)
poppy seeds (optional)
dried minced onion (optional

1. In a mixing bowl, combine yeast, water, oil, and sugar. Stir in the egg and salt. Add 2 cups of flour and the vital wheat gluten. Mix. Gradually add the last cup of flour while mixing until a soft dough forms (you may not need all of it).

2. Turn onto a lightly floured surface. Knead until smooth and elastic, about 5-6 minutes. Divide the dough into about 10 equal pieces. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet, spacing so buns will not touch as they raise. If desired, lightly spray the top of the rolls with cooking spray and sprinkle any or all of the optional toppings on top of the buns. LIGHTLY press onto each bun.

3. Cover and let rise for 15-20 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 425. Bake for 7-10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

Nutritional Information (Amount per bun):

Calories: 195
Protein: 8 g
Fat: 6 g
Saturated Fat: 1 g
Cholesterol: 19 mg
Carbohydrates: 31 g
Fiber: 5 g
Sodium: 68 mg

Recipe Notes: I actually do knead this by hand.  You could do it in a mixer, too.  I find I can control the amount of flour I add more when kneading by hand, oddly enough.  I admit I am not the best at making equal size rolls. This don’t double during the raising period like many bread products. I’d say they maybe get 1.5 times as big as they were. I really like the flavor the topping adds. Especially if you use the onion and garlic, this isn’t just for show. It adds a great little flavor punch to your meal.

Source: adapted from Let’s Dish Recipes

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Rosemary Bread

What’s your favorite part of going out to eat? The ambience? Being served? Not having to cook or to do dishes? The variety? The free bread? I’ll admit, I like all of those things, but all the yummy different breads you can get at restaurants is pretty high up there. Sometimes I’m as extreme as this Jim Gaffigan clip. Most of us can remember what the bread was like at many restaurants – Olive Garden’s breadsticks, Outback Steakhouse’s brown bread. You can even find dozens of copy cat recipes for these online.

Macaroni Grill’s bread? Honestly, it didn’t stick out in my mind. But I found this copy cat recipe on a cooking blog I follow, and I was intrigued. It has become one of our family’s favorites over the last year or so. And the great thing is, even if it looks funky, it tastes delicious. Enjoy!

Rosemary Bread (Makes 2 loaves that serve at least 4 each)

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1 tablespoon instant yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
1 ½ cups warm water (about 110 degrees)
2 ¾ – 4 cups white whole wheat flour
½ teaspoon salt
1 ½ tablespoons dried rosemary, divided, optional
1 tablespoon olive oil, optional
Coarse salt for sprinkling, optional

1. Combine yeast, sugar, water, 2 cups of flour, salt, and 1 tablespoon of rosemary in a large bowl. Use a dough hook if using a stand mixer. Mix well. Continue adding flour, gradually while mixing, until a soft dough is formed (dough should hold it’s shape but be slightly sticky to the touch). Knead dough for about 7 minutes, adding additional flour if dough is not clearing the sides of the bowl anymore.

2. Transfer dough to a lightly greased bowl. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double, usually about 1 hour.

3. Gently deflate dough and divide in half. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment or lightly coat with cooking spray. Shape the dough into 2 oval shaped loaves. Place on baking sheet with room between them to rise without touching each other. Use a pastry brush to coat the top of each loaf with the olive oil (½ tablespoon per loaf). Sprinkle the remaining rosemary and a light sprinkling of salt over the top of each loaf. Cover lightly and let rise in a warm place until puffy and nearly doubled, usually 30 minutes to 1 hour.

4. Preheat oven to 425. Bake loaves for 18-20 minutes, until nicely browned and sound hollow when tapped. Transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.

Nutritional Information (Amount per serving):

Calories: 232
Protein: 9 g
Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: 0.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 45 g
Fiber: 7 g
Sodium: 293 mg

Recipe Notes: If you make this and the loaves rise out more than up on the second rise, DO NOT PANIC. Please cook it anyway, and eat it. This picture is a rare exception of this bread turning out nice and rounded. Even when it is flatter, this bread is very delicious. If it is flattish, I recommend kneading it for a bit longer. As I have increased the kneading time (original recipe said 4-5 minutes), I have had better results. If mixing in all-purpose flour, you won’t need to knead for as long. I have left out the rosemary, olive oil, and salt (or any combination of leaving one or all of those out), and the bread is still super tasty.

Source: slightly adapted from Mel’s Kitchen Cafe

Low-iodine adjustment – use a non-iodized salt.

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Pretzel Rolls (plus a Halloween twist)

When I was a teenager, I liked to experiment with new recipes in the kitchen. One day, I decided I wanted pretzels, so I made some. While a bit of work, they were very tasty. My mom also loved pretzels, so she would have me make them for her occasionally.

These rolls are all the deliciousness of a pretzel with slightly less work. No forming ropes and twisting and shaping. Somehow a roll shape also makes this pretzel feel more like it is dinner worthy and not so much a snack.

The Halloween twist is super easy and takes an already special roll up another notch. In all pretzel rolls, you cut slashes for them to expand. To make them festive, cut jack-o-latern faces or spiders or whatever your heart desires. It makes rolls more fun for the kids on a special night.

Enjoy!

Pretzel Rolls (Makes 16 rolls)

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1 tablespoon instant yeast
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 cups warm skim milk (about 110 degrees)
1 ½ cups warm water (about 110 degrees)
2 teaspoons salt
3 cups white whole wheat flour
3-5 cups all-purpose flour

Water bath:
3 quarts water
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup baking soda

1. In a large bowl, stir together yeast, oil, milk, and water. Add salt and 2 cups of flour. Mix. Gradually add the remaining flour while mixing until dough clears the sides of the bowl and is stiff but still soft. Knead for 4-5 minutes.

2. Let dough rise in a lightly greased bowl, covered, until double in size (about 1 hour).

3. Portion dough into 16 equal pieces, rolling each into a round ball. Lay out on lightly greased parchment or a floured counter. Let dough rest for 15-20 minutes.

4. Bring water bath ingredients to a boil in a large saucepan. Taking one roll at a time, pinch the bottom of the roll to form a pucker and place into boiling water bath. Boil 3-4 rolls at a time. Boil for 30 seconds to 1 minute on each side. Remove from boiling water, letting the excess water drip back into the pan. Place rolls onto baking sheets lined with lightly greased parchment paper.

5. Preheat oven to 425.

6. Use a sharp knife to cut slits (or a holiday design) in the top of each roll about ¼ inch deep.

7. Bake for 20-22 minutes, until deep golden brown.

Nutritional Information (Amount per roll):

Calories: 218
Protein: 7 g
Fat: 3 g
Saturated Fat: less than 1 g
Cholesterol: less than 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 42 g
Fiber: 3 g
Sodium: 306 mg

Recipe notes: I boiled these rolls for at least 1 minute per side. I find you have to boil for a while to get a dark, chewy outside. Don’t be afraid to cut a little deep in step 6. I didn’t go quite deep enough, which is why my design is kind of faint. But be gentle so you don’t deflate the dough. I omitted sprinkling the rolls with salt. I don’t care for it, and it makes the sodium ridiculous. The nutrients on this seem high, I know. They are a large, fairly dense roll. One per person is plenty. Trust me.

Source: Mel’s Kitchen Cafe

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